Thought for Food Blog

Taking the Fat Out of Processed Foods

Posted by Chris Cattini

14-Jan-2015 15:37:00

Since the discovery that dietary saturated fats increase plasma cholesterol levels, low fat foods have been an important area of research, mainly because a link was assumed between plasma cholesterol levels and cardiovascular disease risk.

Recent studies have suggested that the connection between saturated fat intake and cardiovascular health is more tenuous than was previously thought. Despite this, advisory bodies, such as the British Heart Foundation, still recommend that people should avoid saturated fats as much as possible and eat small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fats.

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Topics: acrylamide, processed food, saturated fat, cereals, sensory perception, cholesterol, fibre, dairy, cardiovascular health, additives, fatty acids, sugar and substitutes, consumer behaviour

How Dangerous is Acrylamide?

Posted by Dave Howard

11-Jun-2012 09:27:00

Acrylamide – otherwise known as acrylic amide – is a chemical compound with the chemical formula C3H5NO. Its International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) name is prop-2-enamide. Soluble in chloroform, ether, ethanol and water, it is a white odourless crystalline solid.

In 2002, Professor Margareta Törnqvist et al published their ‘Analysis of acrylamide, a carcinogen formed in heated foodstuffs’ in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. They discovered that acrylamide occurs in numerous starchy, carbohydrate-rich foods, such as crisps (potato chips), chips (French fries) and bread, when cooked at high temperatures.


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Topics: food safety, acrylamide, processed food, cancer, coffee, regulations and guidance, food processing, carbohydrates

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