Thought for Food Blog

If sugar is so bad for us, why is the sugar in fruit OK?

Posted by Shira Rossiter

20-Mar-2018 11:30:00

This post was originally published on The Conversation, and was written by Kacie Dickinson, an accredited practising dietitian and lecturer in Nutrition and Dietetics at Flinders University, alongside Jodi Bernstein, a PHD candidate in Nutritional Sciences, from the University of Toronto.

 

We hear regularly from health organisations and experts that we should eat less sugar. But we’re also told we should eat more fruit.

All types of sugar will give us the same amount of calories, whether they are from fruit or soft drink. But the health risks of eating sugar are related to consuming too many “free sugars” in the diet, not from eating sugars that are naturally present in fruits or milk.

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Topics: health, healthy eating, obesity, nutrition, dieting, food research, diabetes, sugar and substitutes, fruit, monosaccharides, confectionery, water, nutrients, fibre, cancer, cardiovascular health, dairy, appetite and satiety, vegetables

Cereals: Importance and Composition

Posted by Dave Howard

21-Jun-2012 11:44:00

Cereals are grasses and members of the monocotyledon, or monocot, family – one of two major groups of angiosperms (flowering plants) that are traditionally recognised, the other being dicotyledons, or dicots.

They are cultivated for the edible components of their grain (botanically, a type of fruit called a caryopsis), composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran. Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and arguably provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop; they are therefore vital staple produce. The chemical composition of the cereals varies widely and depends on the environmental conditions, soil, variety and fertiliser.

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Topics: rice, cereals, protein, monosaccharides, grains, wheat, agriculture, amino acids, legumes, vitamins and minerals, carbohydrates

The Role of Monosaccharides

Posted by Dave Howard

26-Apr-2012 08:19:00

Carbohydrates can be classified as monosaccharides, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides.

Monosaccharides are simple carbohydrates containing between three and eight carbon atoms, the most common having five or six. They consist of a single sugar molecule – mono meaning ‘one’ and saccharide ‘sugar’.

Monosaccharides are often classified by both their number of carbon atoms and their functional group. For example, an aldohexose is a monosaccharide that contains a total of six carbon atoms including that of an aldehyde in its structure. Similarly, a ketopentose has five carbon atoms in its structure including the one in the keto group.

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Topics: monosaccharides, honey, fruit, vegetables, sugar and substitutes, carbohydrates

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