Thought for Food Blog

Insights from the MSU Global Food Law Conference

Posted by Joanna Becker

15-Aug-2018 13:22:32

Our Regulations & Compliance Executive, Joanna Becker, attended the Michigan State University's Global Food Law Conference in June. The conference brought together thought leaders from across the food law world, providing a platform for sharing knowledge and information around current issues internationally. 

Presentations spanned a variety of innovative topics, from GM crop technology used in Sub-Saharan Africa to reduce vitamin deficiencies, to meat-free alternatives such as “bleeding” plant-based burgers.

The food community is vast and global, so conferences such as this are invaluable, allowing professionals to network, discuss and share experiences and knowledge with each other and ultimately impact and influence legislation for the better.

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Topics: zinc, milk and milk substitutes, food safety, labelling, genetic modification (GM), caffeine, food security, organic, animal welfare, nutrition, pet food, meat, vitamins and minerals, sugar and substitutes, food economics, Escalex, insect foods, novel foods, supplements

How the Lowly Mushroom is Becoming a Nutritional Star

Posted by Shira Rossiter

26-Apr-2018 11:05:00

This post was originally published on The Conversation, and was written by Robert Beelman, Professor of Food Science at Pennsylvania State University.

 

Mushrooms are often considered only for their culinary use because they are packed with flavor-enhancers and have gourmet appeal. That is probably why they are the second most popular pizza topping, next to pepperoni.

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Topics: cancer, antioxidants, nutrition, flavour, protein, healthy eating, gluten free, cholesterol, superfoods, nutrients, fibre, agriculture, immune system, amino acids, selenium, vitamins and minerals, food research, Asia, dieting, health, cognitive function, genetics

Most milk substitutes are low in iodine - here's why it matters

Posted by Shira Rossiter

04-Oct-2017 22:45:00

This post was originally published on The Conversation, and was written by Sarah Bath, a lecturer in Public Health Nutrition and Margaret Rayman, a professor of Nutritional Medicine, both based at the University of Surrey.

Milk and dairy products are the main source of iodine in many diets, and an important iodine source in many countries. However, our latest research found that the iodine concentration of most alternatives to cows’ milk – such as soy and almond “milk” – is very low. This matters because deficiency of iodine, especially during pregnancy, affects brain development and is linked to lower intelligence.

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Topics: milk and milk substitutes, labelling, fish, nutrition, allergies and allergens, seafood, pregnancy, iodine, eggs, soy, dairy, nuts, vitamins and minerals, health, cognitive function, plant-based diets, supplements

Health Check: can chopping your vegetables boost their nutrients?

Posted by Josh Newport

12-Jun-2017 07:00:00

This post was originally published on The Conversation.

We all know eating vegetables is a good way to improve health. And for many years the focus has been on just eating more vegetables, be it fresh, frozen or tinned. But what if there was a quicker and easier way to get more benefit from our vegetables? Can the way we prepare vegetables boost their nutrition? Does tearing or chopping your lettuce makes any difference? And if we chop, does it matter what type of knife we use?

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Topics: nutrition, nutrients, vegetables, enzymes, vitamins and minerals, food research, health, polyphenols

Edible Insects – The Food of the Future?

Posted by Naomi McGrath

10-May-2017 08:30:00

The eating of insects, or entomophagy, is not a new concept. In fact, insects have been eaten around the world since prehistoric times.

 

A history of insect consumption

Stable carbon isotope analysis of the bones and dental enamel of australopithecines, for example, has shown that they were significantly enriched in isotope 13C, suggesting that the diet of these people was largely composed of animals feeding on grasses, including insects. Termites are reported to have been included into the Plio-Pleistocene hominin diet, and an analysis of fossils from caves in the USA and Mexico showed that coprolites from caves in Mexico contained ants, beetle larvae, lice, ticks and mites, providing further evidence for entomophagy in human history. 

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Topics: zinc, texture, food safety, food security, nutrition, protein, allergies and allergens, pesticides, cholesterol, nutrients, magnesium, amino acids, fatty acids, calcium, enzymes, vitamins and minerals, environment and sustainability, Asia, Africa, consumer behaviour, insect foods, novel foods

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