Thought for Food Blog

Most milk substitutes are low in iodine - here's why it matters

Posted by Shira Rossiter

04-Oct-2017 22:45:00

This post was originally published on The Conversation, and was written by Sarah Bath, a lecturer in Public Health Nutrition and Margaret Rayman, a professor of Nutritional Medicine, both based at the University of Surrey.

Milk and dairy products are the main source of iodine in many diets, and an important iodine source in many countries. However, our latest research found that the iodine concentration of most alternatives to cows’ milk – such as soy and almond “milk” – is very low. This matters because deficiency of iodine, especially during pregnancy, affects brain development and is linked to lower intelligence.

Read More

Topics: milk and milk substitutes, labelling, fish, nutrition, allergies and allergens, seafood, pregnancy, iodine, eggs, soy, dairy, nuts, vitamins and minerals, health, cognitive function, plant-based diets, supplements

Health Check: can chopping your vegetables boost their nutrients?

Posted by Josh Newport

12-Jun-2017 07:00:00

This post was originally published on The Conversation.

We all know eating vegetables is a good way to improve health. And for many years the focus has been on just eating more vegetables, be it fresh, frozen or tinned. But what if there was a quicker and easier way to get more benefit from our vegetables? Can the way we prepare vegetables boost their nutrition? Does tearing or chopping your lettuce makes any difference? And if we chop, does it matter what type of knife we use?

Read More

Topics: nutrition, nutrients, vegetables, enzymes, vitamins and minerals, food research, health, polyphenols

Edible Insects – The Food of the Future?

Posted by Naomi McGrath

10-May-2017 08:30:00

The eating of insects, or entomophagy, is not a new concept. In fact, insects have been eaten around the world since prehistoric times.

 

A history of insect consumption

Stable carbon isotope analysis of the bones and dental enamel of australopithecines, for example, has shown that they were significantly enriched in isotope 13C, suggesting that the diet of these people was largely composed of animals feeding on grasses, including insects. Termites are reported to have been included into the Plio-Pleistocene hominin diet, and an analysis of fossils from caves in the USA and Mexico showed that coprolites from caves in Mexico contained ants, beetle larvae, lice, ticks and mites, providing further evidence for entomophagy in human history. 

Read More

Topics: zinc, texture, food safety, food security, nutrition, protein, allergies and allergens, pesticides, cholesterol, nutrients, magnesium, amino acids, fatty acids, calcium, enzymes, vitamins and minerals, environment and sustainability, Asia, Africa, consumer behaviour, insect foods, novel foods

Water - much more than H2O

Posted by Chris Cattini

04-Aug-2016 16:15:36

These days, most people carry a drink with them wherever they go. Every food shop, however small, has a fridge packed with bottled beverages. Some people drink large quantities of sugary soft drinks, others can’t get through the day without copious quantities of coffee, and tea drinkers are happy to respond to recent experimental evidence that suggests tea is a healthy source of liquid sustenance for the human body. However, for purposes of hydration, the most popular choice is water.

Read More

Topics: food quality, fluoride, packaging, salt, nutrients, bacteria, pathogens, magnesium, contaminants, water, retail and marketing, calcium, vitamins and minerals, bone health, cognitive function, central nervous system

Pet Treats

Posted by Chris Cattini

01-Apr-2015 10:36:00

Owners have always given their pets treats. Traditionally, these were human foods – scraps dropped onto the floor at mealtimes, bones buried in gardens and strings of sausages stolen from butchers’ shops, at least in cartoons. I once saw a border collie wolf down an entire kilogram of Cheddar cheese that had been thrown out of a window during a drunken party – perhaps that was more gastrointestinal breeze block than treat, though -- I don’t know what happened to the dog afterwards.

Dog biscuits in various shapes and colours have been around for a long time, as have specially formulated chocolate drops that don’t contain theobromine, which is poisonous to dogs. But in recent times, commercial treats for cats and dogs have become increasingly popular.

Read More

Topics: allergies and allergens, gluten free, pet food, diabetes, obesity, retail and marketing, vitamins and minerals, consumer behaviour

What do you want to read about?

We are open to suggestions!

If there is a topic that you would like to see covered in a future Thought for Food blog post, then please email us with your idea and we will be sure to look into it.

Receive blog updates by email

Latest Posts

Posts by Topic

Further Topics